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  /*
   [The "BSD license"]
   Copyright (c) 2005-2009 Terence Parr
   All rights reserved.
  
   Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
   modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
   are met:
   1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
      notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
  2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
      notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
      documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
  3. The name of the author may not be used to endorse or promote products
      derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
 
  THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR
  IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
  OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED.
  IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
  INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
  NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
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  THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
  (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
  THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
  */
 package org.antlr.runtime.debug;
 
All debugging events that a recognizer can trigger. I did not create a separate AST debugging interface as it would create lots of extra classes and DebugParser has a dbg var defined, which makes it hard to change to ASTDebugEventListener. I looked hard at this issue and it is easier to understand as one monolithic event interface for all possible events. Hopefully, adding ST debugging stuff won't be bad. Leave for future. 4/26/2006.
 
 public interface DebugEventListener {
Moved to version 2 for v3.1: added grammar name to enter/exit Rule
 
 	public static final String PROTOCOL_VERSION = "2";

serialized version of true
 
 	public static final int TRUE = 1;
 	public static final int FALSE = 0;

The parser has just entered a rule. No decision has been made about which alt is predicted. This is fired AFTER init actions have been executed. Attributes are defined and available etc... The grammarFileName allows composite grammars to jump around among multiple grammar files.
 
 	public void enterRule(String grammarFileNameString ruleName);

Because rules can have lots of alternatives, it is very useful to know which alt you are entering. This is 1..n for n alts.
 
 	public void enterAlt(int alt);

This is the last thing executed before leaving a rule. It is executed even if an exception is thrown. This is triggered after error reporting and recovery have occurred (unless the exception is not caught in this rule). This implies an "exitAlt" event. The grammarFileName allows composite grammars to jump around among multiple grammar files.
 
 	public void exitRule(String grammarFileNameString ruleName);

Track entry into any (...) subrule other EBNF construct
 
 	public void enterSubRule(int decisionNumber);
 
 	public void exitSubRule(int decisionNumber);

Every decision, fixed k or arbitrary, has an enter/exit event so that a GUI can easily track what LT/consume events are associated with prediction. You will see a single enter/exit subrule but multiple enter/exit decision events, one for each loop iteration.
 
 	public void enterDecision(int decisionNumberboolean couldBacktrack);
 
 	public void exitDecision(int decisionNumber);

An input token was consumed; matched by any kind of element. Trigger after the token was matched by things like match(), matchAny().
 
 	public void consumeToken(Token t);

An off-channel input token was consumed. Trigger after the token was matched by things like match(), matchAny(). (unless of course the hidden token is first stuff in the input stream).
 
 	public void consumeHiddenToken(Token t);

Somebody (anybody) looked ahead. Note that this actually gets triggered by both LA and LT calls. The debugger will want to know which Token object was examined. Like consumeToken, this indicates what token was seen at that depth. A remote debugger cannot look ahead into a file it doesn't have so LT events must pass the token even if the info is redundant.
	public void LT(int iToken t);

The parser is going to look arbitrarily ahead; mark this location, the token stream's marker is sent in case you need it.
	public void mark(int marker);

After an arbitrairly long lookahead as with a cyclic DFA (or with any backtrack), this informs the debugger that stream should be rewound to the position associated with marker.
	public void rewind(int marker);

Rewind to the input position of the last marker. Used currently only after a cyclic DFA and just before starting a sem/syn predicate to get the input position back to the start of the decision. Do not "pop" the marker off the state. mark(i) and rewind(i) should balance still.
	public void rewind();
	public void beginBacktrack(int level);
	public void endBacktrack(int levelboolean successful);

To watch a parser move through the grammar, the parser needs to inform the debugger what line/charPos it is passing in the grammar. For now, this does not know how to switch from one grammar to the other and back for island grammars etc... This should also allow breakpoints because the debugger can stop the parser whenever it hits this line/pos.
	public void location(int lineint pos);

A recognition exception occurred such as NoViableAltException. I made this a generic event so that I can alter the exception hierachy later without having to alter all the debug objects. Upon error, the stack of enter rule/subrule must be properly unwound. If no viable alt occurs it is within an enter/exit decision, which also must be rewound. Even the rewind for each mark must be unwount. In the Java target this is pretty easy using try/finally, if a bit ugly in the generated code. The rewind is generated in DFA.predict() actually so no code needs to be generated for that. For languages w/o this "finally" feature (C++?), the target implementor will have to build an event stack or something. Across a socket for remote debugging, only the RecognitionException data fields are transmitted. The token object or whatever that caused the problem was the last object referenced by LT. The immediately preceding LT event should hold the unexpected Token or char. Here is a sample event trace for grammar: b : C ({;}A|B) // {;} is there to prevent A|B becoming a set | D ; The sequence for this rule (with no viable alt in the subrule) for input 'c c' (there are 3 tokens) is: commence LT(1) enterRule b location 7 1 enter decision 3 LT(1) exit decision 3 enterAlt1 location 7 5 LT(1) consumeToken [c/<4>,1:0] location 7 7 enterSubRule 2 enter decision 2 LT(1) LT(1) recognitionException NoViableAltException 2 1 2 exit decision 2 exitSubRule 2 beginResync LT(1) consumeToken [c/<4>,1:1] LT(1) endResync LT(-1) exitRule b terminate
Indicates the recognizer is about to consume tokens to resynchronize the parser. Any consume events from here until the recovered event are not part of the parse--they are dead tokens.
	public void beginResync();

Indicates that the recognizer has finished consuming tokens in order to resychronize. There may be multiple beginResync/endResync pairs before the recognizer comes out of errorRecovery mode (in which multiple errors are suppressed). This will be useful in a gui where you want to probably grey out tokens that are consumed but not matched to anything in grammar. Anything between a beginResync/endResync pair was tossed out by the parser.
	public void endResync();

A semantic predicate was evaluate with this result and action text
	public void semanticPredicate(boolean resultString predicate);

Announce that parsing has begun. Not technically useful except for sending events over a socket. A GUI for example will launch a thread to connect and communicate with a remote parser. The thread will want to notify the GUI when a connection is made. ANTLR parsers trigger this upon entry to the first rule (the ruleLevel is used to figure this out).
	public void commence();

Parsing is over; successfully or not. Mostly useful for telling remote debugging listeners that it's time to quit. When the rule invocation level goes to zero at the end of a rule, we are done parsing.
	public void terminate();
	// T r e e  P a r s i n g
Input for a tree parser is an AST, but we know nothing for sure about a node except its type and text (obtained from the adaptor). This is the analog of the consumeToken method. Again, the ID is the hashCode usually of the node so it only works if hashCode is not implemented. If the type is UP or DOWN, then the ID is not really meaningful as it's fixed--there is just one UP node and one DOWN navigation node.

Parameters:
t
	public void consumeNode(Object t);

The tree parser lookedahead. If the type is UP or DOWN, then the ID is not really meaningful as it's fixed--there is just one UP node and one DOWN navigation node.
	public void LT(int iObject t);
	// A S T  E v e n t s
A nil was created (even nil nodes have a unique ID... they are not "null" per se). As of 4/28/2006, this seems to be uniquely triggered when starting a new subtree such as when entering a subrule in automatic mode and when building a tree in rewrite mode. If you are receiving this event over a socket via RemoteDebugEventSocketListener then only t.ID is set.
	public void nilNode(Object t);

Upon syntax error, recognizers bracket the error with an error node if they are building ASTs.

Parameters:
t
	public void errorNode(Object t);

Announce a new node built from token elements such as type etc... If you are receiving this event over a socket via RemoteDebugEventSocketListener then only t.ID, type, text are set.
	public void createNode(Object t);

Announce a new node built from an existing token. If you are receiving this event over a socket via RemoteDebugEventSocketListener then only node.ID and token.tokenIndex are set.
	public void createNode(Object nodeToken token);

Make a node the new root of an existing root. See Note: the newRootID parameter is possibly different than the TreeAdaptor.becomeRoot() newRoot parameter. In our case, it will always be the result of calling TreeAdaptor.becomeRoot() and not root_n or whatever. The listener should assume that this event occurs only when the current subrule (or rule) subtree is being reset to newRootID. If you are receiving this event over a socket via RemoteDebugEventSocketListener then only IDs are set.

	public void becomeRoot(Object newRootObject oldRoot);

Make childID a child of rootID. If you are receiving this event over a socket via RemoteDebugEventSocketListener then only IDs are set.

	public void addChild(Object rootObject child);

Set the token start/stop token index for a subtree root or node. If you are receiving this event over a socket via RemoteDebugEventSocketListener then only t.ID is set.
	public void setTokenBoundaries(Object tint tokenStartIndexint tokenStopIndex);
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