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Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one or more contributor license agreements. See the NOTICE file distributed with this work for additional information regarding copyright ownership. The ASF licenses this file to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance with the License. You may obtain a copy of the License at http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0 Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. See the License for the specific language governing permissions and limitations under the License.
 
package org.apache.mahout.math.function;
/*
Copyright 1999 CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research.
Permission to use, copy, modify, distribute and sell this software and its documentation for any purpose 
is hereby granted without fee, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and 
that both that copyright notice and this permission notice appear in supporting documentation. 
CERN makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any purpose. 
It is provided "as is" without expressed or implied warranty.
*/

A comparison function which imposes a total ordering on some collection of elements. Comparators can be passed to a sort method (such as org.apache.mahout.math.Sorting.quickSort) to allow precise control over the sort order.

Note: It is generally a good idea for comparators to implement java.io.Serializable, as they may be used as ordering methods in serializable data structures. In order for the data structure to serialize successfully, the comparator (if provided) must implement Serializable.

public interface FloatComparator {

  
Compares its two arguments for order. Returns a negative integer, zero, or a positive integer as the first argument is less than, equal to, or greater than the second.

The implementor must ensure that sgn(compare(x, y)) == -sgn(compare(y, x)) for all x and y. (This implies that compare(x, y) must throw an exception if and only if compare(y, x) throws an exception.)

The implementor must also ensure that the relation is transitive: ((compare(x, y)>0) && (compare(y, z)>0)) implies compare(x, z)>0.

Finally, the implementer must ensure that compare(x, y)==0 implies that sgn(compare(x, z))==sgn(compare(y, z)) for all z.

Returns:
a negative integer, zero, or a positive integer as the first argument is less than, equal to, or greater than the second.
  int compare(float o1float o2);

  
Indicates whether some other object is "equal to" this Comparator. This method must obey the general contract of Object.equals(Object). Additionally, this method can return true only if the specified Object is also a comparator and it imposes the same ordering as this comparator. Thus, comp1.equals(comp2) implies that sgn(comp1.compare(o1, o2))==sgn(comp2.compare(o1, o2)) for every element o1 and o2.

Note that it is always safe not to override Object.equals(Object). However, overriding this method may, in some cases, improve performance by allowing programs to determine that two distinct Comparators impose the same order.

Parameters:
obj the reference object with which to compare.
Returns:
true only if the specified object is also a comparator and it imposes the same ordering as this comparator.
See also:
java.lang.Object.hashCode()
  boolean equals(Object obj);
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